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White Supremacist (Domestic Terrorist) in America Have Killed More Americans Than Terrorist - Page 1

By Holly Yan, CNN

(CNN) When "a little army" of men with shields and other riot gear was spotted near a Pride parade in Idaho on Saturday, authorities soon linked the men to a relatively new White nationalist group and charged them with conspiracy to riot. "It is clear to us based on the gear that the individuals had with them, the stuff they had in their possession, the U-Haul with them along with paperwork that was seized from them, that they came to riot downtown," Coeur d'Alene Police Chief Lee White said. Among those arrested was Thomas Ryan Rousseau -- the leader of Patriot Front, the sheriff's office said. In total, 31 people from at least 12 states were arrested and charged with conspiracy to riot. All have been released on bond. Most of the men arrested had logos on their hats "consistent with the Patriot Front group," and some had other clothing associated with the White supremacist group, White said. Here's what we know about Patriot Front -- and what makes it different from other groups:

Group of 31 men had shields, riot gear and smoke grenade, officials say
Graeme Massie Los Angeles

A truck full of masked men from the Patriot Front extremist group were arrested near an Idaho city’s Pride in the Park event, police say. Law enforcement stopped a U-haul truck in downtown Coeur d’Alene on Saturday afternoon and detained 31 people, all wearing the same outfit, who were inside, according to KREM2. The men inside the U-haul were all dressed the same in khakis, blue shirts, beige hats and a white cloth covering their faces. Officers cuffed them with zip ties, put them in police vans and took them away from the scene. Police said the men had shields, shin guards, riot gear and a smoke grenade with them when they made a traffic stop. “They came to riot downtown,” the city’s police chief Lee White told a press conference on Saturday. The group’s members were charged with conspiracy to riot, a misdemeanor charge, and police said they had an “operations plan” with them.

Deidre Montague

When I heard about the Buffalo shooting, I was really disheartened. Hearing that this 18-year-old shooter was influenced by the “Great Replacement” theory, brought tears to my eyes for the families and friends of the beautiful ten individuals whose lives were snatched away from this world. For those who may be unfamiliar with this racist ideology, the “Great Replacement Theory” is a conspiracy theory that “says that there is a plot to diminish the influence of white people.” People who subscribe to this theory believe that “this goal is being achieved both through the immigration of nonwhite people into societies that have largely been dominated by white people, as well as through simple demographics, with white people having lower birth rates than other populations,” according to The Associated Press. In their April 2022 report, Define American identified what anti-immigration messages were most pervasive on the platform, YouTube. They were able to map out the top-performing anti-immigration content creators of the last 13 years and analyzed their messaging tactics, which they discovered that their “underlying arguments support the white nationalist theory of “The Great Replacement,” or the idea that immigrants of color will overtake predominantly white nations, causing a “white genocide.”

Zeleb.es

From Christchurch to Buffalo, white supremacy has been mentioned over and over again as the cause that has incited mass shootings in the United States and elsewhere. Fox News journalist Tucker Carlson has been singled out as the biggest promoter of these views, but how true are in these allegations?

Erin Mansfield and Candy Woodall, USA TODAY

Congressional candidate Joe Kent took to Twitter last summer to repeat a racist theme that has become commonplace in the country’s immigration debate and upcoming elections. “The left is supporting an invasion of illegal immigrants to replace American voters and undercut working class jobs,” Kent wrote. Then in the spring, in an interview with a white nationalist group, he nodded along as the host said Democrats don't care about the "Anglos" or "the founding stock of America." “You believe they’re trying to replace white Americans?” the host asked. “Yes,” Kent responded. “Yeah, and they’ll say, if you even mention that, you’re some sort of a neo-Nazi, white nationalist, ‘That’s the replacement theories.’ Well, no. You’re literally trying to replace an American.” Backed by former President Donald Trump, Kent is a Republican from Washington seeking to take a seat in Congress from Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, one of 10 Republicans who voted to impeach the former president for his role in the Jan. 6 insurrection.

By David Morgan

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Senate Republicans blocked a bill titled the Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act in Congress on Thursday that Democrats view as a response to a white supremacist's killing of 10 Black people this month and a potential gateway to a gun control bill. Two days after another mass killing of 19 young children and two teachers at a Texas school, senators voted 47-47 along party lines, short of the 60 senators required to launch debate, to reject the bill authorizing federal agencies to monitor and report jointly on domestic terrorism within the United States, including incidents related to white supremacy. Republicans said the legislation was unnecessary as Democratic President Joe Biden already had the authority to organize his administration's response to violent extremism. Democrats insisted the bill was needed to bolster the federal government's response to rising incidents of violent extremism at home. The outcome, which had been expected, cut off the chance for any immediate action on gun-control legislation to address a rising tide of mass shootings in the United States. Senators were due to leave Washington for a one-week Memorial Day holiday break.

Jerry Barmash

ROCKVILLE CENTRE, NY — It's been several days since the ultra-right-wing group the Proud Boys marched into Rockville Centre for a second time. While Democratic politicians from the area and other parts of Nassau County condemned the rally within 24 hours of the Saturday march, Republicans have been slower to respond. Rockville Centre Mayor Francis Murray has not issued a statement. After the Proud Boys came into the village in October, Murray claimed he wasn't familiar with the alt-right group. Murray eventually condemned the previous march as a "hateful group." Patch left multiple messages for the mayor's spokesperson. We also tried to reach Proud Boys Long Island via Twitter for comment. Another Republican that has yet to specifically address what happened is County Executive Bruce Blakeman. He marched in the Celebrate Israel parade last weekend with Rep. Lee Zeldin (gubernatorial candidate) and others, where he condemned recent acts of anti-Semitism. "Hate has no place in our society," Blakeman posted to Facebook.

Gary Craig, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

Afederal judge Monday sentenced a local white supremacist to eight years for illegal firearms possession, telling the man that he likely got the guns "as part of a racist agenda." The sentence for Stephen Pattison, a convicted felon who could not have guns, was less than the maximum sentence of 10 years sought by prosecutors but significantly over the sentence recommended by federal guidelines. The recommended sentence range, which judges do not have to follow if they find exceptional reasons not to do so, was 46 to 57 months. In the aftermath of racist and other violence, people often ask, "Were there warning signs, were there red flags?," U.S. District Judge David Larimer said Monday in sentencing Pattison. There are many "red flags" that could predict future violence from Pattison, Larimer said. Pattison, 33, had numerous racist social media postings, many in which he spoke of violence against Black people. While Pattison claimed he took illegal possession of a shotgun and rifle for his family to have — he was returning to prison for violating parole — prosecutors contended that it was evident from his social media that he was inclined to use the guns for racist-fueled violence.

jlahut@insider.com (Jake Lahut)

Fox News weekend host Howard Kurtz dedicated a segment on his Sunday show to defending colleague Tucker Carlson, marking the latest example of the network taking a top-down approach to backing its primetime star. Carlson, the face of the nation's most viewed cable news show, is again facing backlash and the heightened attention he's become accustomed to, this time following the May 14 Buffalo mass shooting and his well-documented echoing of white supremacist rhetoric and adjacent conspiracy theories, including the shooting suspect's self-professed embrace of the "great replacement" theory. "Now his comments on immigration and politics and those of anyone at this network are, of course, fair game for public debate," Kurtz said, with Mediaite first cataloging the segment. "But blaming him for the shooting is absurd. The latest case of a blood on your hands approach to finger pointing." Kurtz, who joined Fox News in 2013 after hosting "Reliable Sources" for CNN, dismissed comparisons to the suspect's online writings with Carlson's on-air rhetoric as "knee-jerk partisanship." He also compared Carlson to the late conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh, falsely asserting that former President Bill Clinton blamed Limbaugh "in part" for the Oklahoma City bombing (Clinton only referred to "promoters of paranoia" and did not mention Limbaugh by name).

Robert P. Jones

In the wake of the massacre in Buffalo, we have all, naturally, tried to understand what could have caused someone to commit such a horrific act of violence. This young white man linked his motivations to fears about demographic and cultural changes in the U.S., dynamics that he believed were resulting in the replacement of “the white race.” The shooting has spurred a national discussion about the mainstreaming of these concerns, often summarized under the term “replacement theory.” Most of the attention has been given to the demographic component of this theory, while the cultural aspects have been overlooked. But the fear of cultural replacement has an unambiguous lineage that gives it specific content. At the center of the “great replacement” logic, there is—and has always been—a desperate desire to preserve some version of western European Christendom. Far too many contemporary analysts, and even the Department of Justice, have not seen clearly that the prize being protected is not just the racial composition of the country but the dominance of a racial and religious identity. If we fail to grasp the power of this ethno-religious appeal, we will misconstrue the nature of, and underestimate the power of, the threat before us.

Fatma Khaled

Republican Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia recently complained about the focus on white supremacists and suggested that America should focus on other issues. "Jerrold Nadler was on the House floor and he was talking about white supremacy," she said during an appearance on Real America's Voice, Raw Story reported on Sunday. Greene was referring to Democratic New York Representative Jerrold Nadler's remarks on the House floor on May 18 where he called for a stricter response to hate crimes. "And he [Nadler] was bringing up the terrible shooting that happened in [Buffalo] New York, but totally ignoring the shooting that happened in California that I think involved an Asian man that was the shooter," she added in an apparent reference to the California church shooting in Laguna Woods last week that left one dead and 5 others injured. Authorities said that the suspect is an "Asian man in his 60s" who was later identified as David Wenwei Chou.

by Joan McCarter, Daily Kos Staff

The highest ranking Republican official in U.S. government, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, repeatedly refused to denounce “replacement theory” in a press conference Tuesday afternoon. That puts him in company with New York Rep. Elise Stefanik, the third in command among House Republicans who seems to be an adherent of the white nationalist conspiracy theory. The slaughter of 10 Black Americans in Buffalo by a white nationalist terrorist and the reaction to that carnage clarifies a whole hell of a lot about the Republican Party of 2022 and the individual members of it. Especially McConnell, who controls half of the Senate and is the one person with the most power to turn the white supremacist GOP ship around. He won’t do it. Asked repeatedly Tuesday about his responsibility as a party leader to condemn the theory, he refused, dancing around the question instead by calling the shooter a “deranged young man,” refusing to acknowledge the motivation behind the massacre. The most he would do is condemn generic racism. “Look—racism of any sort is abhorrent in America and ought to be stood up to by everybody, both Republicans, Democrats, all Americans,” McConnell said.

salarshani@businessinsider.com (Sarah Al-Arshani)

Republican senators are trying to block legislation that passed in the House that would give more government resources towards preventing domestic terrorism following a fatal shooting at a Buffalo supermarket, the Hill reported. On Wednesday, the House narrowly passed the Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act of 2022 mostly along party lines, with a 222-203 vote. The legislation would create offices at the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Justice and the FBI that would track and investigate domestic terrorism threats. The passage in the House came days after a gunman opened fire at a Tops supermarket in Buffalo, New York, killing 10 people. Authorities said the suspect, an 18 year-old white man, drove hours to the predominantly black community and was motivated by hate. The suspect is allegedly a white nationalist who believes in the replacement theory, according to a manifesto posted online.

Lee Moran

Alocal Colorado news anchor reminded viewers of Rep. Lauren Boebert’s (R-Colo.) past open embrace of the racist “replacement theory” that reportedly inspired the massacre at a supermarket in Buffalo, New York, last weekend. “There are some conservative political figures that will hint about this theory or speak about it in code. And then there’s Colorado’s Republican congresswoman Lauren Boebert,” Kyle Clark said on Denver’s 9News this week. Clark cut to footage of Boebert talking just last year about the baseless conspiracy theory that claims Democrats are trying to replace white Americans with immigrants.

Joey Garrison, USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – President Joe Biden said "white supremacy is a poison" and vowed "hate will not prevail" during a trip Tuesday to Buffalo, New York, where he grieved with family members of 10 victims killed Saturday in a racially motivated mass shooting at a supermarket. "What happened here is simple, straightforward terrorism," Biden said. "Domestic terrorism inflicted in the service of hate and a vicious thirst for power that defines one group of people being inherently inferior." Biden and first lady Jill Biden met with families of the shooting victims, who ranged from 32 to 86 years old. Most were Black, either shopping or working at a Tops Friendly Market in one of Buffalo's highest concentrated African American neighborhoods. The slain included a civil rights advocate, a deacon and a heroic security guard. The president condemned the gunman's "hateful, perverse ideology rooted in fear and racism" and called out those who have pushed the "Great Replacement Theory" – the belief that white Americans are being systematically "replaced" by immigrants and minorities. Biden said that "through the media and politics," the Internet has "radicalized angry, lost and isolated individuals" into believing the theory.

Ed Pilkington | Guardian News

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is failing to address the rising scourge of white supremacist violence despite stark warnings that such attacks pose the greatest domestic terrorism threat in the US, a leading authority on law enforcement has told the Guardian. Michael German, a former FBI special agent who infiltrated white supremacist groups in the 1990s, said the bureau continues to underplay the scope of the threat. As a result, communities targeted by white supremacists and far-right militia groups – such as the largely African American neighborhood of Buffalo, New York, where 10 people were killed by a suspected racist gunman this week – are left fatally exposed. Related: How the Buffalo massacre is part of US tradition: ‘We’ll continue to see killings’ “US law enforcement is failing, as it long has, to provide victimized communities like Buffalo’s with equal protection under the law. They are not actually investigating the crimes that occur,” said German, a fellow with the Brennan Center at NYU School of Law. Saturday’s mass shooting in Buffalo was allegedly carried out by a white gunman who selected the Tops supermarket because it served one of the largest Black populations in the state. In a 180-page diatribe he is believed to have posted online, he espoused the false racist belief that white Americans are being “replaced” by immigrants of colour.

ABC News

As Democrats have ratcheted up condemnation of "replacement theory" in the wake of Saturday's mass shooting in Buffalo, New York, some Republicans on Capitol Hill have shied away from rejecting the racist idea that some members of their own party have espoused. At a news conference Tuesday afternoon, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell was asked repeatedly about his views of "replacement theory," a conspiracy theory that holds that Democrats are trying to replace white Americans with undocumented immigrants and people of color in order to win elections. He repeatedly avoided denouncing it outright. McConnell was asked whether he, as the party leader, had a responsibility to speak out against the theory, which authorities say was adopted by the 18-year-old white man accused of killing 10 Black people at a local food market. He responded by denouncing the actions of the suspect, calling him a "deranged young man," but making no mention of "replacement theory." Pressed again by reporters on whether the Republican Party is obligated to denounce the theory, McConnell condemned racism generally. "Look -- racism of any sort is abhorrent in America and ought to be stood up to by everybody, both Republicans, Democrats, all Americans," McConnell said.

Buffalo gunman is suspected of posting a 180-page racist diatribe in which he repeatedly referenced the extremist conspiracy theory
Ed Pilkington

Why are we talking about the ‘great replacement’ theory? On Saturday, a white man armed with an AR-15-style rifle entered a supermarket in Buffalo in New York state and killed 10 people, almost all of whom were African American. The gunman is suspected of having posted a 180-page racist diatribe in which he repeatedly referenced the extremist conspiracy theory known as the “great replacement”. The Buffalo shooter drew heavily on the white supremacist rantings of the gunman in the 2019 massacre at a mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, in which 51 people were killed. His similarly hate-filled statement was titled “The Great Replacement”. What is ‘great replacement’ theory and how did its racist lies spread in the US? Why are we talking about the ‘great replacement’ theory?  At its heart, the theory claims falsely that white people are being stripped of their power through the demographic rise of communities of color, driven by immigration. The lie has been integral to many of the most horrifying recent acts of white supremacist violence in the US. Far-right protesters at the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, which led to the killing of a woman, chanted “You will not replace us”. Replacement theory featured in the rants of mass shooters at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh in 2018 in which 11 people were murdered; a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, in which 23 were killed in 2019; and a synagogue in Poway, California, the same year in which one person died.

American far right has long embraced Hungary’s prime minister, who speaks of Europe’s ‘suicidal’ immigration policies
Flora Garamvolgyi and Julian Borger

Hungary’s nationalist leader, Viktor Orbán, will be the star speaker at an extraordinary session of America’s Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) to be held in Hungary this week, in an effort to cement bonds between the radical right on both sides of the Atlantic under the banner of the “great replacement” ideology. In a speech on Monday, Orbán made explicit reference to the ideology, which claims there is a liberal plot to dilute the white populations of the US and European countries through immigration. Increasingly widespread among US Republicans, the creed was cited by the killer who opened fire on Saturday in a supermarket in a predominantly black area of Buffalo, New York. Speaking in Buffalo on Tuesday, Joe Biden called it a “perverse ideology” and “a lie”.

by Dawn Megli

The heavily armed gunman who opened fire Saturday in a Buffalo, N.Y., grocery store — and is suspected of killing 10 victims in a racially motivated attack — had the number 14 written on his semiautomatic rifle. It is a reference to the popular white supremacist slogan known as the “14 Words” and a call to action to defend the white race. As a reporter for a weekly community newspaper in Thousand Oaks, I have become all too familiar with the 14 Words this year because white supremacists have been demonstrating in my town. A group that calls itself White Lives Matter unfurled its hateful message from the Borchard overpass on the 101 Freeway in February and March. Unlike the Buffalo shooter, they didn’t come to kill. They came to recruit, law enforcement officials said. At my church on Sunday, the pastor prayed for those mourning in Buffalo since they had joined the grim fraternity of cities that, like ours, now know the unspeakable horror and inescapable grief of a mass shooting. On Nov. 7, 2018, a Marine veteran opened fire at the Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks, killing 12. Our town still weeps. The White Lives Matter demonstrators, men hiding behind face masks, used drones to capture footage of their actions as they unfurled a banner over the 101 Freeway and performed training exercises in a nearby public park. Some wore shirts from the Rise Above Movement, a far-right street-fighting gang that spreads white supremacist propaganda. The footage filmed in Thousand Oaks was used in recruiting videos posted online.

by Amanda Marcotte

The bodies of the mostly-Black victims of the white nationalism-inspired mass shooting in Buffalo weren't even cold on Saturday before the folks at Fox News identified the real victims here: White conservatives. As I predicted they would on Sunday, the whining from right-wing media has since reached ear-piercing levels of shrill in response to mainstream media correctly pointing out that Republicans and their media have been hyping the "great replacement" conspiracy theory that shooter Payton Gendron used to justify the killing of 10 people. But this isn't just an attempt to evade accountability. Fox News pundits are now exploiting the Buffalo shooting to draw their viewers further into white nationalism. Network personalities are romanticizing the hateful ideology that allegedly inspired a massacre as a dangerous truth that the "elite" are trying to suppress. This shooting really illustrates how Fox News has created a victim narrative for its viewers that is so potent that no event is so horrible or violent — including a deadly insurrection in the Capitol or the mass murder of innocent people — that can't be weaponized by the propaganda machine to further radicalize Republican voters.

Zaron Burnett III

The mass violence of white supremacists often gets written off as evil acts perpetrated by ‘lone wolves,’ but the history of white power movements reveals a coordinated agenda and international network of hate. When the police arrived, 22-year-old white supremacist Brandon Russell was seated on the curb outside of his apartment in Tampa, Florida. His head was in his hands as tears streamed down his face. The horror of what he’d just witnessed haunted him; the founder of the “Atomwaffen Division” neo-Nazi cell had returned to the home he shared with three other young neo-Nazis after a weekend away in May 2017. Two of his roommates had been shot dead by his third roommate, 18-year-old Devon Arthurs. The Tampa police searched the apartment. In the unit’s garage space, the detectives found a cache of weapons and supplies for a bomb-making operation, including “sacks of explosive precursors,” radioactive materials and two Geiger counters. In the apartment, the police found a copy of Mein Kampf, the white power novel The Turner Diaries and a framed photograph of Timothy McVeigh. For young white supremacists, these three items are an unholy trilogy — a starter kit for racial violence. They’re also physical proof that the young white supremacists typically labeled “lone wolves” are, in fact, part of a highly motivated, loosely organized international network who all share the same hateful agenda.

Jon Skolnik

Last month, Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., went on Fox News to deliver a diatribe about the apparent ills of open borders, a policy that President Biden has never supported but was nevertheless cited by the senator as an attempt to "remake the demographics of America." But now, in the wake of a deadly mass shooting carried out by white supremacist who echoed a similar sentiment, Johnson's comments are coming back to bite him, with many commentators arguing that the senator supports a racist conspiracy theory that's likely to lead to more violence in the months to come. The uproar stems from a shooting this weekend in Buffalo, New York, where ten people were killed and three were injured as part of a racially-motivated attack on a predominantly Black neighborhood in the city. Prior to the attack, the 18-year old killer, Payton Gendron, published a 180-page manifesto online, making multiple references to the "Great Replacement," a baseless right-wing conspiracy theory alleging that the Democrats are attempting to loosen borders in order to replace the white electorate with more pliant citizens from the Third World.

Ron Dicker

Fox News host Mark Levin blatantly supported the “great replacement theory” Tuesday on his radio show, joining colleague Tucker Carlson and top House Republican Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y.) in pushing a racist conspiracy embraced by the gunman charged in the Buffalo, New York, mass killing. Carlson, denounced by political leaders for promoting the baseless idea hundreds of times on his prime time show, on Tuesday attempted to dance around the controversy by declaring he wasn’t sure what it was. Levin took the direct route. The theory stokes white fear by asserting that elite Democrats and others are scheming to replace white Americans with people of color through immigration or to undermine white influence in other ways. It has gained footing among conservatives, including several mainstream Republican Senate candidates. The accused Buffalo shooter repeatedly cited the white supremacist theory in a 180-page racist screed. “The ‘great replacement’ ideology is indeed a policy of the Democrat policy,” Levin said. “They have celebrated it. They’ve spoken of it. Obama has, Biden has.” Levin, the host of “Life, Liberty and Levin” on Fox News, praised Stefanik for her leadership and for her ad asserting that “illegal immigrants ... will overthrow our current electorate and create a permanent liberal majority in Washington.”

Ryan Bort

Tucker Carlson has long promoted the idea of the “great replacement,” a racist conspiracy theory holding that white people are being systematically replaced by immigrants. The theory was present throughout the 180-page manifesto of the teenager who killed 10 people at a Buffalo supermarket on Saturday, leading to renewed scrutiny of the mega-popular Fox News host. Carlson addressed that scrutiny on Monday night, essentially arguing that anyone espousing white supremacist views should be able to do so without fear of criticism. “Because a mentally ill teenager murdered strangers, you cannot be allowed to express your political views out loud,” he said. “That’s what they’re telling you. That’s what they’ve wanted to tell you for a long time, but Saturday’s massacre gives them a pretext and a justification.”

Candace McDuffie

The murder of 10 people—who were mostly Black—at a Buffalo grocery store Saturday was a deplorable act of violence against folks who are already incredibly vulnerable. Payton Gendron—the 18-year-old white male terrorist responsible for the gruesome killings—drove over 100 miles to gun down innocent victims in a Black neighborhood. He is not a lone wolf or someone who suffered from mental health issues. Gendron is a self-identified white supremacist who carefully calculated how to slaughter Black people to uphold an organized system of power. The fact is he justified his heinous actions through rhetoric found on right wing media platforms. Through mouthpieces like Fox News’ Tucker Carlson and Sean Hannity. Through people like commentator Ben Shapiro. Through political figures like Congresswoman Elise Stefanik and Governor Ron DeSantis. Through organizations like the Republican party. Through presidents like Donald Trump. Their racist ideologies incite racist violence—which is why they all need to be stopped. Most notably, “white replacement theory,” or the fear that white people are in danger of becoming this country’s minority, is the foundational framework of conservative pundits. And it’s the reason mass shootings—like the ones in Charleston, Pittsburgh and El Paso—are becoming more and more frequent.

by Justin Peters

On Saturday, an 18-year-old man toting a gun with the N-word inscribed on the barrel went to a Tops supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y., and shot 13 people, 10 of them fatally. In a screed that authorities believe was posted online before the massacre, shooter Payton Gendron allegedly acknowledged that he had sought out the supermarket explicitly in order to kill Black people. “I simply became racist after I learned the truth,” Gendron wrote, and the truth as he understood it was that “the White race is dying out” and that “We are doomed by low birth rates and high rates of immigration.” Gendron stated that his attack was, “beyond all doubt, anti-immigration, anti-ethnic replacement and anti-cultural replacement.” Thesis statements for mass murder rarely come clearer. Gendron wrote that he had developed his ideology after immersing himself in message boards over the past few years, but observers could not help but notice the broad thematic similarities between some of Gendron’s ideas and ones that are routinely voiced by Fox News host Tucker Carlson, the apple-cheeked bard of white resentment. Carlson, who in years past was best known as the bow-tied co-host of CNN’s Crossfire, has risen from the ash heap of political punditry by expertly stoking his viewers’ own fears of being culturally replaced by immigrants and other such nogoodniks whose beliefs, backgrounds, and skin tones differ from their own.

Daniel Arkin

Fox News personality Tucker Carlson is facing intense scrutiny from extremism experts, media watchdogs and progressive activists who say there is a link between the top-rated host’s “great replacement” rhetoric and the apparent mindset of the suspect in the weekend’s deadly rampage in Buffalo, New York. The white suspect accused of killing 10 people and wounding three others Saturday at a supermarket in a predominantly Black neighborhood apparently wrote a “manifesto” espousing the white supremacist “great replacement” conspiracy theory — elements of which Carlson has pushed on his weeknight show. The theory baselessly holds that a cabal of Jewish people and Democratic elites are plotting to “replace” white Americans with people of color through immigration policies, higher birth rates and other social transformations. The idea circulated on the far-right fringes before moving to the mainstream of conservative media. “Tucker Carlson has made comments that directly reference this conspiracy theory on his show,” said Michael Edison Hayden, a spokesman for the Southern Poverty Law Center, an organization that tracks white supremacy, hate groups and extremism.

Vivian Kane

This weekend, an 18-year-old white man who self-identifies as a white supremacist drove to a grocery store in a predominantly Black area of Buffalo, New York and shot 13 people, killing 10 of them. The man posted a 180-page manifesto online, in which he wrote at length about a “replacement” theory—a common white supremacist ideology that white people in the U.S. and worldwide are being “replaced” by growing immigrant, Jewish, and POC populations. They refer to this as “white genocide,” and many believe that, in the U.S., changing demographics are the result of a deliberate political ploy to increase Democratic voters. If that sounds at all familiar, it’s probably because what was once a fringe extremist conspiracy theory has become the centerpiece of Tucker Carlson’s nightly narrative. Just a few weeks ago, the New York Times published a three-part story about Tucker Carlson’s rising influence as he’s become one of the most dangerous people in America, working every night to normalize white supremacist ideologies: Last spring, Mr. Carlson caused an uproar when he promoted on air the notion of the “great replacement” — a racist conspiracy theory, once relegated to the far-right fringe, that Western elites are importing “obedient” immigrant voters to disempower the native-born. The Anti-Defamation League called for his firing, noting that such thinking had helped fuel a string of terrorist attacks. But this was hardly something new for Mr. Carlson. In more than 400 episodes, the Times analysis found, he has amplified the idea that a cabal of elites want to force demographic change through immigration.

Matt Shuham

The white supremacist mass shooter who targeted Black shoppers at a supermarket in Buffalo Saturday, after writing in a manifesto that he was doing so because whites were being purposefully replaced by people of color, was acting on a rich vein of conservative thought. Right-wing pundits and politicians have for years accumulated money and power with the message that a liberal elite was systematically “replacing” white Americans in order to wrest power from Americas’ historic racial majority. The notion is commonly referred to as “great replacement theory,” “white replacement theory” or “white genocide,” and it’s been inspiring shooters and bolstering Republicans for years. After the shooting, some major proponents of that assertion doubled down. Others claimed the attack was a staged “false flag” or the work of shadowy government insiders, a typical dodge.

‘It Is A FACT’
One of the highest-profile Republicans to voice a version of the replacement theory is Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-NY), the third-ranking Republican in the House of Representatives. Last year, Stefanik said in a campaign ad that Democrats wishing to provide a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants wanted to “overthrow our current electorate.” The policy amounted to a “PERMANENT ELECTION INSURRECTION,” Stefanik said.

Philip Bump | The Washington Post

Tragedy can be clarifying. The massacre of 10 shoppers and employees at a Tops supermarket in a Black neighborhood in Buffalo over the weekend was precisely the sort of extremist violence that authorities have been worried about for years. Late in 2020, the Department of Homeland Security issued a warning about domestic violent extremism that has been on the rise; when Joe Biden was inaugurated months later, he used his first speech as president to warn of “a rise in political extremism, white supremacy, domestic terrorism that we must confront and we will defeat.” Polling from Pew Research Center conducted last month found that a third of Black Americans worried almost every day about being attacked for their race. In other words, both police and potential victims worried about an attack just like this one. What’s clarifying, though, is that what appears to have occurred would at every step until the trigger was pulled have been defended with right-wing rhetoric that has increasingly filtered into mainstream Republican rhetoric. The shooting suspect allegedly purchased a highly regulated firearm in New York, modified it and — seemingly influenced by extremist online rhetoric and espousing a conspiracy theory about race — used the weapon to kill Black people in a heavily Black neighborhood miles from his house. It’s all there: access to guns, unmoderated rhetoric from the Internet, “replacement theory.” Each a focus of fervent advocacy in recent years despite the ways in which their overlap was demonstrably toxic. We can begin with “replacement theory,” the idea that there’s a coordinated effort from elite Americans to replace native-born voters with immigrants to gain an electoral advantage.

Jenny Jarvie, Molly Hennessy-Fiske

Bored during the early days of the pandemic, Payton Gendron logged on to the 4chan message board website to browse ironic memes and infographics that spread the idea that the white race is going extinct. He was soon lurking on the web’s even more sinister fringes, scrolling through extremist and neo-Nazi sites that peddled conspiracy theories and anti-Black racism. It wasn’t until he spotted a GIF of a man shooting a shotgun through a dark hallway, and then tracked down a livestream of the 2019 killing of 51 people at two mosques in New Zealand, that Gendron appeared to have found his calling: as a virulently racist, copycat mass shooter with a craving for notoriety. The white 18-year-old from Conklin, N.Y., suspected of killing 10 people Saturday in a Buffalo, N.Y., supermarket, appears to represent a new generation of white supremacists. They are isolated and online, radicalized on internet memes and misinformation, apparently inspired by livestreams to find fame through bloodshed, much of it propelled by convoluted ideas that the white race is under threat from everything from interracial marriage to immigration.

Brad Dress

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres on Sunday condemned the mass shooting at a Buffalo, N.Y., grocery market over the weekend, calling the attack a “vile act of racist violent extremism.” In a statement, Guterres gave his condolences to the 13 victims of the shooting at Tops Friendly Market, at least 10 of whom were killed. Guterres said he was appalled by the shooting, which authorities are investigating as a hate crime. Eleven of the victims are Black and the gunman allegedly published a racist manifesto online before the shooting. “The Secretary-General condemns in the strongest terms racism in all its forms and discrimination based on race, religion, belief or national origin. We must all work together towards building more peaceful and inclusive societies,” the statement read. The gunman, who was wearing a tactical vest and had briefly livestreamed the shooting on Twitch, surrendered to police. Payton Gendron, 18, of Conklin, N.Y., was arraigned on a first-degree murder charge Saturday evening. Gendron, who is white, allegedly wrote and published a 180-page manifesto via 4Chan, an online social forum in which he espoused racist ideas and white supremacist ideology including the “great replacement” theory, or a belief that liberals are intentionally replacing white people with minorities in the U.S. for political benefit.

Jon Queally

Amid the outpouring of grief and heartache following Saturday's massacre in Buffalo that left 10 people dead and three wounded, critical observers say the racial animus which evidence shows motivated the killer must be seen in the larger context of a white nationalist mindset that has increasingly broken into the mainstream of the right-wing political movement and Republican Party in recent years. Taken into custody at the scene of the mass shooting at the Tops Market was Payton Gendron, the white 18-year-old male who has charged with murdering the victims. Gendron live-streamed his attack online and also posted a detailed, 180-page document that has been described by those who have reviewed it — including journalists and law enforcement — as a white nationalist manifesto rife with anti-Black racism, antisemitism and conspiracy theories about "white replacement." Amid the outpouring of grief and heartache following Saturday's massacre in Buffalo that left 10 people dead and three wounded, critical observers say the racial animus which evidence shows motivated the killer must be seen in the larger context of a white nationalist mindset that has increasingly broken into the mainstream of the right-wing political movement and Republican Party in recent years. Taken into custody at the scene of the mass shooting at the Tops Market was Payton Gendron, the white 18-year-old male who has charged with murdering the victims. Gendron live-streamed his attack online and also posted a detailed, 180-page document that has been described by those who have reviewed it — including journalists and law enforcement — as a white nationalist manifesto rife with anti-Black racism, antisemitism and conspiracy theories about "white replacement."

By Tom Boggioni | Raw Story

In a biting editorial on Monday morning, the editorial board of the Wall Street Journal called out politicians and conservative media personalities for promoting the conspiratorial "white replacement theory" that was at the heart of the horrific mass shooting in Buffalo, New York on Saturday. As Yahoo News reports, a manifesto reportedly written by the 18-year-old gunman who murdered ten and wounded three at a grocery store in Buffalo "includes dozens of pages antisemitic and racist memes, repeatedly citing the racist 'great replacement' conspiracy theory frequently pushed by white supremacists, which falsely claims white people are being 'replaced' in America as part of an elaborate Jewish conspiracy theory." According to the WSJ editors, "We’ll learn more about the shooter’s motives and mindset, but it’s worth noting a report in the Buffalo News that an official in the school Mr. Gendron attended in Conklin, N.Y., said he had spoken of wanting to go on a shooting spree. He fits the profile of other young men who become mass shooters at an age when mental illness often strikes. Keeping guns out of the hands of the mentally ill isn’t easy, but it’s one form of gun control that would do some good." Moving past the mental illness element, the editors said blame must also be placed upon those whose words are writings may have influenced the shooter.

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